Couple sue over IP glitch that repeatedly sent Feds to their house

Couple sue over IP glitch that repeatedly sent Feds to their house

8
14


Couple sue over IP glitch that repeatedly sent Feds to their house


8 COMMENTS

  1. “The Arnolds are asking for compensatory and punitive damages in excess of $75,000.”
    they should ask for more than that… a lot more. The local police, FBI, etc should be paying not MaxMind. Nothing like paying your taxes and the very people you pay with those taxes abusing their positions and doing exactly what they did here. If you dont understand the basic’s of networking and how an IP address works you shouldn’t be investigating any type of cyber crime. Again the FBI, police etc didn’t do their job correctly and or lacked training to do their job correctly. MaxMind was just providing the service and obviously even the FBI and others didnt understand what service they paid for…
    If Maxmind has to pay, every time a gun owner uses their guns in illegal ways… Glock/X manufacture would get sued. That is wrong!!!! Hold the government and the investigating agencies accountable for once! That is their job after all.

    ]]>

  2. The police eventually figured it out and posted a sign on the property, asking people to call them instead of harassing the residents. MaxMind wasn’t just providing a service: it was substituting this particular farmhouse address because the exact middle of the country, as accepted by geography experts, had an ungainly set of GPS coordinates. From the sounds of it, MaxMind had no idea that this nightmare would spring from that substitution. When Kashmir Hill told the company about it, MaxMind moved to fix two instances of people’s homes being substituted for “sort of in/the middle of/we don’t really know where” situations.
    I could see the suit having merit when it comes to holding MaxMind accountable. But we’ll see what the courts say.

    ]]>

  3. A similar problem with GPS locations. If you enter an address that it can’t find (misspelled name or wrong number?), some units will point to the center of the zip code if you give one. I NEVER enter the zip code for that reason.

    ]]>

  4. Last Friday, a man came to my house looking for his wife’s iPhone. Police were called and wanted permission to search my house and garage. Turns out the phone had been misplaced in the building where she works. It had never left the building.

    ]]>

  5. Short answer: Yes.
    Longer answer: What it (tries to do) does is take your (public) IP Address and compare it to a set of lists (and probably other resources nowadays) that detail where in the world that IP Address is located physically. It then passes that information on to the other thing.
    Other: What the article is talking about is called Geolocation, for a proper explanation I highly recommend looking at wikipedia or another reliable source of your choosing. (I probably should have brushed up on the topic before replying, now that I think about it…)

    ]]>

  6. The problem with IP addresses alone is you can end up extremely far from the mark. My sister uses CenturyLink. Doing a search on her current IP address “pinpoints” her in Denver, Colorado, not her actual location – a mere 864 miles apart. It did the same thing for me when I was using CenturyLink as well saying I was located 851 miles from my actual location.

    ]]>

  7. The 3G Modem I owned some years ago was “pinpointed” to exist somewhere in the Northern Territory (Australia) rather than along the south-eastern coast where I had been at the time. I found it amusing at the time, but can see how it could easily cause people a lot of grief when a fallback is set up with such a terrible default.

    ]]>

LEAVE A REPLY

Inline
Inline