What your hacked account is worth on the Dark Web

What your hacked account is worth on the Dark Web

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11 COMMENTS

  1. “querty” would likely be a notch or two down from the top of the 100-worst-passwds list
    Sorry Mark; had to say it.
    🙂

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  2. Interesting article, however, two misspelled words. Armour should be armor. Favourite should be favorite. Just so you know.

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  3. Naked Security’s house style is to stick to the spelling and usage that each author would use unexceptionably at home.
    So those writers from countries where British English is the norm, such as Australia, the UK and South Africa, get to be organised, to retain the final -e that Noah Webster chopped off the end of the word axe, to refer to the season in which the leaves fall from the trees as autumn, and to refuel their cars with petrol.
    Similarly, those of our writers from American English countries have the honor to write about the center of the curb, to assume that hockey involves ice without explicitly saying so, and to have gotten used to the fact that restrooms aren’t for taking naps.
    As I suspect you figured out all along.

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  4. I’d always gots purdy good grammaticals, but it’s interesting to note how often I still learn. I’ve always preferred the word “axe” in its three-lettered form, unaware that it’s a Britishism (or rather I suppose that our dropping “e” is an Americanism). I lean eastward preferring “grey” to “gray” but don’t typically look under my bonnet to check oil, nor do I properly pressurise the tyres on my lorrie.
    Language is still fun, and I’m such a nerd…
    Cheers to all NS writers and readers, irrespective of upon which side of which pond they reside! *
    * Apologies to Winston Churchill

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  5. You serious dude? You realize that the English way to spell it is Armour and Favourite. Kind of like how we also spell it Colour.

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  6. Interesting article. However, misspelled words, favourite should be favorite, armour should be armor. Armour is the French word for love. Just saying.

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  7. Languages are full of examples where the word X in one language means something different (perhaps even rude!) in another. But that doesn’t change its meaning in the first language. For example, the English word “mist” means “manure” in German. But we can still use it to describe a prevalent English weather condition akin to fog. (No jokes about the English weather actully being a heap of manure, please.)
    Of course, the French word for “love” isn’t “armour,” it’s “liefde.” And, because this is an entirely unrelated but cool thing to know, like this whole thread so far, the Afrikaans word for “orange” is “lemoen.”

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  8. I think people should concentrate on reading and thanking rather than being grammar or spelling nazis. Kinda, kills the point for the author , in my view 🙂
    Grow up folks !

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